Shopper’s guide to door hardware

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Shopper’s guide to door hardware

By emily.bailey

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Shopper’s guide to door hardware | Schlage

You’ve arrived in the aisle and…whoa! There are a lot of choices. This guide will help you navigate and choose the best hardware for your doors.

 

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So, your old door knob broke. Or maybe you finally noticed you’ve got bright brass on your doors and satin nickel hardware everywhere else in the house. The point is, you’ve arrived in the aisle and…whoa! There are a lot of choices.
 

You may be surprised to learn there are actually a lot of different types of door hardware designed for different types of doors in the home. There’s hardware for closet and hall doors that don’t need to lock, locking hardware for bedrooms and bathrooms, non-turning pulls for doors that don’t latch, keyed entry and deadbolts for exterior doors – and that’s just to name a few! So how do you know where to start?
 

Don’t worry – Schlage is here to decode your door hardware needs. We’ve put together a few handy decision trees to guide you through grabbing the right door hardware the first time. The first question you’ll want to ask yourself is really simple – how many holes are in your door?
 

We refer to the round holes where the door lock is installed as “bore holes” (brush up on your door hardware terminology here.) You’ll either have one, two, or three. If the door has no bore holes, you can install a non-turning or “dummy” knob or lever that serves as a decorative door pull.

Single bore hole

Does your door have only one bore hole? Refer to the decision tree graphic below to guide you through. Hint: the function colors in the decision tree correspond to the function color in the aisle, so you can match them up to easily find what you need.

1 bore hole - Door hardware - Schlage


ELECTRONIC OR MECHANICAL?
 

Mechanical door hardware - Schlage
Mechanical door hardware - Door lever - Schlage
Door hardware - Door levers - Schlage
Mechanical door hardware - Door knob - Schlage
Door hardware - Door knobs - Schlage
Electronic - Door hardware - Schlage
Keyless electronic lock - No cylinder
1 Bore Hole - Schlage Touch Keyless Touchscreen Lever
Electronic lock - Back-up key
1 Bore hole - Electronic lock - Schlage Keypad lever

The first question to ask yourself is whether you want an electronic or mechanical lock for this door. If it’s an interior door, you’ll really only want an electronic lock if you want to be able to closely control access – perfect for wine cellars or home offices. Electronic locks also add a lot of convenience to interior areas because you don’t have to keep track of a key to get in. Just set an access code that you can easily change or delete if needed.
 

If you choose electronics, you’ll just have to decide whether you want a back-up key or not. The Schlage Touch™ Keyless Touchscreen Lever has no cylinder and therefore no key. If you prefer the option of a backup key, we recommend a Schlage Keypad Lever.

 

If there’s no need to closely control access and you’d rather go with a simple mechanical lock, your first decision to make is whether you want a knob or a lever. Knobs offer a classic look, while levers can be easier to operate, especially when your hands are full. From there, you can drill down to the functionality the knob or lever will need: is it an exterior door where you want extra security? If so, choose a keyed lock. Otherwise you’ll need either a bed & bath lock with push-button locking or a hall & closet knob or lever that simply turns to let you in. Consider Schlage Custom™ Combined Interior Door Hardware, which allows you to switch between locking and non-locking functionality. That way, when the extra bedroom becomes a nursery, you can just switch from locking to non-locking instead of replacing the whole lock.

 

From there is the fun part – choosing the perfect style and finish for your home!

 

Double bore hole

Does your door have two bore holes? Two bore holes means it must be an exterior door. The ideal setup is a deadbolt at the top with a knob or lever below it. Refer to the decision tree graphic below to guide you through. Hint: the function colors in the decision tree correspond to the function color in the aisle, so you can match them up to easily find what you need.

Door hardware - 2 Bore Holes - Schlage
 


ELECTRONIC OR MECHANICAL DEADBOLT?
 

Door hardware - 2 bore holes - door lever - Schlage
Exterior door hardware - Door lever - Schlage
Door hardware - 2 bore holes - door knob - Schlage
Exterior door hardware - Door knob - Schlage
Electronic - Door hardware - Schlage

Electronic - Door hardware - Schlage

Your first decision is whether you want a mechanical or electronic deadbolt. They both offer the same level of security and durability, but electronic deadbolts have a lot of possibilities to offer in terms of keyless convenience. You can forget about losing your keys or keeping track of copies and use access codes instead, and you can sometimes pair the lock with your smartphone for even easier setup and control. Scroll to the last decision tree graphic to find the right electronic option for you.

 

Once you decide which kind of deadbolt you prefer, you can choose whether you’d like a knob or a lever below it. Some folks prefer to use a keyed entry lock below the deadbolt. If you prefer this option and pair it with a mechanical deadbolt, it’s best to buy them in a paired package so they’ll be keyed alike and you won’t have to carry two separate keys. You can also take your locks to your local hardware store to have them keyed alike if the combo you prefer does not come as a set. If you chose an electronic deadbolt and place a keyed lock below it, you’ll still have to carry a key and will eliminate the benefit of going keyless. Our recommendation is an electronic deadbolt with a non-locking knob or lever beneath.

 

Triple bore hole

If your door has two main bore holes with a third smaller hole further down, you’ll need a deadbolt at the top and a front entry handle below it. Refer to the decision tree graphic below to guide you through.

Door hardware - 3 Bore Holes - Schlage
 


ELECTRONIC OR MECHANICAL DEADBOLT?
 

Door hardware - Mechanical - Schlage
3 bore holes - Mechanical deadbolt - Schlage
Door Hardware - Electronic - Schlage
3 bore holes - Electronic deadbolt - Handleset - Schlage

Just like with two bore holes, your first decision is whether you want a mechanical or electronic deadbolt. They both offer the same level of security and durability, but electronic deadbolts have a lot of possibilities to offer in terms of keyless convenience. You can forget about losing your keys or keeping track of copies and use access codes instead, and you can sometimes pair the lock with your smartphone for even easier setup and control. Scroll to the last decision tree graphic to find the right electronic option for you.

 

Once you decide which kind of deadbolt you prefer, you’ll want to choose a front entry handle in a style and finish to match.

 

Choosing an electronic deadbolt

 

You know you want the security and convenience of an electronic deadbolt, but which deadbolt is right for you? Refer to the decision tree graphic below to guide you through.

Electronic locks - Smart locks - How to choose
 


CONNECT TO SMARTPHONE OR HOME AUTOMATION SYSTEM?
 

Non-connected - Electronic locks - Schlage
Keyless electronic lock - No cylinder
Electronic locks - Schlage Touch Keyless Deadbolt
Electronic lock - Back-up key
Electronic locks - Schlage Keypad Deadbolt
Connected locks - Smart locks - Schlage
Connected locks - Wi-fi - Bluetooth- Schlage
Connected smart lock - Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt
Connected locks - Z-wave - Schlage
Connected lock - Schlage Connect

Do you want to pair your lock with a home automation or security system?
 

If not, the options are simple. You can choose a Schlage Touch Keyless Touchscreen Deadbolt if you want to go completely keyless. If you like the idea of having a backup key, the Schlage Keypad Deadbolt is better for you.
 

If you do want to pair your lock with your smartphone and open up third-party smart home/security integration options, you can choose between the Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt or the Schlage Connect Touchscreen Deadbolt.

 

The primary difference between these two options is that the Schlage Connect lock uses a communications protocol called Z-Wave, so if you already have a Z-Wave enabled system like SmartThings, that lock will be your best option. Features vary across platform provider, but remote access is a common feature.

 

Alternatively, the Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt uses Bluetooth to pair with your smartphone so you can enjoy easy setup and control through the app. The lock works with HomeKit and HomePod if you only plan on using iOS devices with your lock. Or you can pair the Schlage Sense lock with the Schlage Sense Wi-Fi Adapter, a simple wall plug-in that connects to your home Wi-Fi signal to allow you to access your lock from anywhere using your internet-connected smartphone – both iOS and Android. With the Wi-Fi Adapter, options to integrate with third-party systems like Amazon Alexa become available, with new integrations coming out all the time. 

 

We hope this guide helps you navigate the wide world of door hardware. Have more questions? Reach out to us on Facebook or Twitter.

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