Homeowner’s guide to door hardware terminology

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Homeowner’s guide to door hardware terminology

By pooja.katkar

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Homeowner’s guide to door hardware terminology | Schlage

When shopping for door hardware that meets your specs for security, performance and style, it helps to be able to talk the talk.

 

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Whether exploring the world of door hardware online at websites like schlage.com or visiting your local home improvement store to purchase door hardware that meets your specs for security, performance and style, it helps to be able to talk the talk.

 

From backset to bore, strike plate to spindle, we’d like to help you understand some of the more common terminology and help unlock the sometimes mysterious and occasionally confusing world of door hardware. It’s actually easier than it sounds once you get the hang of it, and at the very least, we’ll be able to help you impress your friends with your newly realized knowledge as well as provide some practical understanding of the various door lock and security options available to you.

BHMA:

This stands for the Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association. This organization ensures the quality and performance of builder’s hardware through a grading system that evaluates the hardware’s endurance under laboratory conditions to simulate real-world usage. The grading system is expressed alphabetically (A, B and C) and looks at three different categories: Security, Durability and Finish.

Chassis and Trim - Door Hardware - Glossary - Schlage

Chassis:

Like your car, this is the body of the lock, without any trim which can be chosen specifically to fit the uniqueness of your home’s look and style. Visit schlage.com to see a variety of mechanical and electronic options including the latest smart locks.

Trim:

A trim plate attached to the door under the knob or lever. Depending upon the type and style of lock you choose, there will be a number of available trim styles and finishes to meet your specific preferences.

Bore holes:

Bore holes are the holes in the door that allow door hardware to be installed. The cross bore is the main hole drilled into the face of the door where the body of the lock (chassis) is installed. The edge bore is the hole drilled from the side of the door to the cross bore to allow the latch of the lock to be installed.

Bore holes:

Bore holes are the holes in the door that allow door hardware to be installed. The cross bore is the main hole drilled into the face of the door where the body of the lock (chassis) is installed. The edge bore is the hole drilled from the side of the door to the cross bore to allow the latch of the lock to be installed.

Deadbolt:

One of the strongest methods of securing a door, deadbolts are operated only using a key from the exterior or thumbturn from the interior. The deadbolt is typically installed above a knob, lever or grip for a handleset.

Backset:

The distance from the edge of the door to the center line of the prepared hole drilled to install most locks. With all installations, there are minimum and maximum measures for your lock to be compatible.

Escutcheon - Door Hardware - Glossary - Schlage

Escutcheon:

This refers to any plate that surrounds a keyhole or lock, including trim and handleset plates. It protects the lock cylinder from being drilled out and protects the surrounding area from being scratched by the end of a key.

Faceplate:

The metal plate on the edge of the door that protects the lock from wear and tear.

Handing:

Handing is a term used to indicate how a door swings. This is important to know when choosing a compatible lock for your use. A left-handed lever has the door hinges located on the left side as you look at the door’s exterior. A right-handed lever has the door hinges located on the right side of the door as you look at it from the outside. For more information, check out our blog post on understanding lever and door handing.

Latch bolt:

Sometimes abbreviated as latch, this is the type of lock that has a beveled, spring- operated bolt that engages when you close the door. If you’ve ever accidentally locked yourself out of your house or a hotel room, you know this type well.

Latch bore:

Also known as an edge bore, this is the hole drilled from the side of the door into the cross bore and accommodates the sliding of the deadbolt. The diameter of this hole is generally 1” to accommodate most bolts from either mechanical or electronic locksets.

Spindle:

The spindle is the bar that connects knobs or levers through the door and operates the lock mechanism.

Strike plate::

Similar to a faceplate, the strike plate is a metal plate that is affixed to the doorjamb and has a hole (or holes) that accommodate the lock bolt. It is not only decorative. The strike plate protects the doorjamb and adds security to the opening.

For more information on door terminology or installation help, visit Schlage’s How-to center.
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