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Door Hardware Terminology | Schlage

Glossary of Door Hardware Terms and Terminology

 

This glossary of door hardware terms and terminology can help you better understand the various door lock and security options Schlage offers.

 

 

ANSI: American National Standards Institute.
Backset: The distance from the edge of the door to the center line of the prep in the door.
Chassis: The body of the lock itself, without any trim.
Cylinder: The portion of a lock containing the plug with keyway and a body with the pin tumbler mechanism. The properly cut key allows the cylinder to rotate the driver mechanism which unlocks the lock.
Glossary of door hardware terminology and terms.
Hand: A term used to indicate how a door swings. Left-handed lever: from the exterior, door hinges located on the left side. Right-handed lever: from the exterior, door hinges located on right side.
Latchbolt: A spring operated bolt with a beveled face to permit a latching action when the door closes.
Pin Tumbler Mechanism: Most key operated locks provide limited access through the use of pin tumblers.

   - Pin
      Tumblers:

Small sliding pins in a lock cylinder that work against coil springs. They prevent the cylinder plug from rotating until the appropriate length pin is raised to the proper height by corresponding notch depth cut in the key. Pin tumblers usually consist of bottom pins, top pins and master pins.

   - Bottom
      Pins:

Usually a cylindrical shaped tumbler which is often bullet shaped and comes in a variety of lengths that correspond to the depth of the cut of the notch in the key.

   - Top Pins:

Usually a cylindrical shaped tumbler which is often flat on both ends and is installed directly under a coil spring in the spring stack.

   - Master Pin:

Usually a cylindrical shaped tumbler which is often flat on both ends, placed between the top and bottom pin to create an additional shear line.
Rose: A circular trim plate attached to the door under the knob or lever.
Shear Line: The area where the top surface of the plug and the cylinder housing meet. The height which the bottom pins must be raised by the key in order to rotate the key cylinder.
Spindle: Bar which connects knobs or levers through the door and operates the lock mechanism.